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Week 6 w/c 6.7.20

For the first part of this week I’d like you to have a go at some SPAG based writing activities to remind yourselves of some of the key SPAG objectives you’ll have learnt this year. Then later in the week you’re going to have a go at some writing linked to the adventure.

 

Day 1

Today we’re going to be thinking about fronted adverbials.

 

An adverbial is a word or phrase that has been used like an adverb to add detail or further information to a verb (an easy way to remember what an adverb is: it adds to the verb).

 

Adverbials are used to explain how, where or when something happened; they are like adverbs made up of more than one word.

 

For example:

In the sentences above, the verbs are in pink and the adverbials are in blue.

 

'Fronted' adverbials are 'fronted' because they have been moved to the front of the sentence, before the verb. In other words, fronted adverbials are words or phrases at the beginning of a sentence, used to describe the action that follows.

 

A comma is normally used after an adverbial.

For example:

The fronted adverbials in these sentences are in blue.

 

Have a watch of the video here to find out a bit more. Then have a go at the quiz to test your knowledge.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zp937p3

 

Today I’d like you to have a go at a couple of activities to remind you about how to use fronted adverbials.

1. Complete the task below starting each sentence with the fronted adverbial.

2. Look at the picture below. I’d like you to write some sentences to describe it using fronted adverbials to start your sentences. Remember a fronted adverbial could explain where, when, why or how the following action takes place.

E.g. Running from the volcano, hundreds of people charge as fast as they can.

Day 2

Today we’re going to be thinking about relative clauses.

 

A relative clause is a specific type of subordinate clause that describes or gives more information about a noun. The relative clause is used to add information about the noun, so it must be ‘related’ to the noun. Relative clauses add information to sentences by using a relative pronoun such as who, that or which.

 

Here are some examples of relative clauses (in purple):

A relative clause can also be an embedded clause if it is positioned in the middle of a sentence. It can be embedded using two brackets, commas or dashes, for example:

Have a watch of the video here to find out a bit more. Then have a go at the quiz to test your knowledge.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zsrt4qt

 

Today I’d like you to have a go at a couple of activities to remind you about how to use relative clauses.

  1. Complete the task below. After the underlined word add a relative clause that adds more information about the noun. E.g. My teacher, who is called Mrs Oldroyd, told me to try my best.
  2. Look at the picture below. I’d like you to write some sentences to describe it using relative clauses to start your sentences. Remember a relative clause adds more information about the noun so you could first write down all the nouns you can see.

 

Day 3

Today we’re going to be thinking about prepositions and prepositional phrases.

 

Prepositions are linking words in a sentence. We use prepositions to explain where things are in time or space. Prepositions tell us where something is (for example, beside, under, on, against, beneath or over) or when something is happening (for example: until, during, after, before or more specifically 'on Christmas Day', 'at twelve o'clock' or 'in August').

 

Prepositions usually sit before nouns (or pronouns) to show the noun's (or pronoun's) relationship to another word in the sentence.

Prepositional phrases are groups of words that describe where something is. A prepositional phrase includes the object that the preposition in a sentence is referring to and any other words that link it to the preposition, for example: "He hid beneath the duvet."

 

Have a watch of the video here to find out a bit more. Then have a go at the quiz to test your knowledge.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zwwp8mn/articles/zw38srd

 

Today I’d like you to have a go at a couple of activities to remind you about how to use prepositions.

  1. Complete the different tasks from the sheet below.
  2.  Look at the picture below. I’d like you to write some sentences to describe it using prepositional phrases in your sentences. Remember that a preposition can say where one noun is in relative to another so you could start with finding lots of nouns. E.g. The looming figure or Mount Vesuvius is behind the ancient ruins of Pompeii.

 

Day 4

Today we’re going to be thinking about using colons and semi colons in a list.
 

You use a colon to introduce a list of items. The part that goes before the colon must be a main clause (full sentence).

There are numerous facilities in the new and improved hotel:
This part is a full sentence and it introduces the list that will follow.

You then could list the facilities just using a comma.
There are numerous facilities in the new and improved hotel: a restaurant, a swimming pool and a gym.

Or you could use semi colons to separate items in the list if you want to add more detail to them using other punctuation.
There are numerous facilities in the new and improved hotel: a restaurant, that serves many different cuisines; a swimming pool, that has five slides; and a gym, which has incredible equipment.

There are some rules to remember when using colons and semi colons in a list.

  • The part before a colon must be a full sentence
  • If you use semi colons in a list there must be other punctuation in there
  • After the colon you must use a lowercase letter
  • You use a semi colon before the final ‘and’
  •  

Watch the videos below to get some more information about how colons and semi colons work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t34Yp9v5A6c

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdykLlB0F7E

 

I’d now like you to think about the hotel you’ve been designing from the adventure activities. I’d like you to write some sentences (similar to the one above) to describe some things about the hotel using colons and semi colons in a list.

 

You might describe the hotel as a whole, the facilities on offer, the excursions available, the restaurants and the outdoor areas.

 

Day 5

Today I’d like you to write an invitation for people to attend the grand opening of the hotel you’ve designed for Gino.

 

When writing your invitation, you need to be persuasive to encourage as many people to visit as possible. You also need to include information, so they understand what they are invited to such as:

  • Where the event is
  • When it is taking place
  • Why they should come
  • What they will see
  • What they will do at the event
  • What they will get e.g. any freebies or deals
     

Invitation Structure:

Dear ______,

Paragraph One: Explain that they are invited to the hotel opening and when/where it is.

Paragraph Two: Describe what they will see/do. Why should they come?

Paragraph Three: Remind about time and place. Tell them how much you're looking forward to seeing them there.

From _______.
 

Have a look at the example of a formal invitation below for some more ideas.

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